‘Witch’ confronts devilish problems

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Audrey Francis (Elizabeth) and Ryan Hallahan (Scratch) in 'Witch' at Writers Theatre. Michael Brosilow photo)
Audrey Francis (Elizabeth) and Ryan Hallahan (Scratch) in ‘Witch’ at Writers Theatre. Michael Brosilow photo)

There’s a lot to think about in “Witch,” Jen Silverman’s new play now at Writers Theatre. Staged in Writers’ intimate Gillian Theatre, the acting is first rate as cast members portray issues and problems Silverman raises that are both age-old and au courant.

Six characters, Sir Arthur David Alan Anderson), lord of the castle and village Elizabeth (Audrey Francis), viewed by the village as a witch, Cuddy (Steve Haggard), Sir Arthur’s son, Frank Thorny (Jon Hudson Odom), a villager that Sir Arthur sees as the son he wishes he had , Winnifred (Arti Ishak) a villager/cum castle maid supposedly married to Frank, and Scratch (Ryan Hallahan, a handsome devil, grapple with issues ranging from homosexuality, women’s status, ambition and using violence to solve problems to patriarchal desires, community biases based on underlying fear, despair, revolution maybe, and hope.

If that isn’t enough, there is are underlying themes of achieving one’s wish through outside forces such as help from the devil or by one’s self and what would drive a person to sell one’s soul.

Wow, those are a lot of issues to cover in a 95 minute show and would likely bring about lively post show discussions.  There will be post show conversations after Tuesday and Wednesday night shows and at special events Oct. 28 at 11:30 a.m. and Nov. 12 at 6:30 p.m.

The play, inspired by “The Witch of Edmonton” written by William Rowley, Thomas Dekker and John Ford in 1621, is set during the Jacobean era. However, it uses contemporary phraseology such as the discussion between Elizabeth and devil where she asks if they are “on the clock” meaning are his arguments an effort to get her to agree to trade her soul for what she wants or are they merely having an intriguing conversation.

Jon Hudson Odom (Frank Thorny), l, David alan Anderson (Sir Arthur), Arti Ishak (Winnifred) and Steve haggard (Cuddy) in 'Witch' at Writers Theatre. (Michael Brosilow photo)
Jon Hudson Odom (Frank Thorny), l, David alan Anderson (Sir Arthur), Arti Ishak (Winnifred) and Steve haggard (Cuddy) in ‘Witch’ at Writers Theatre. (Michael Brosilow photo)

The Jacobean-period setting when King James VI of Scotland ruled 1567 to 1625 and became King of England as James I in 1603, was interesting but arguably conflicted with 21st century vocabulary.

The same issues have existed for centuries as was noted by Jean-Bapatiste Alphonse Karr’s quote, “plus ca change…” (the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Given that the problems still exist and the idea of witches among us still exists, Silverman’s play could be placed at any time similarly to how the plays of William Shakespeare have been re-set.

But because the play is well-directed by Marti Lyons, the acting is exceptional and the thoughts are compelling, maybe audiences won’t mind the discrepancy between the period and the vocabulary.

DETAILS: “Witch” is at Writers Theatre, 325 Tudor Court, Glencoe, through Dec. 16, 2018. Running time: 95 min., no intermission. For tickets and other information call (847) 242-6000 and visit Writers Theatre.

Jodie Jacobs

For more shows visit Theatre in Chicago

 

 

 

Around Town in October

October has enough food, music, art and fall events to fill several calendars. Here are just a few of the events to tack up on the board.

The photography exhibit is in Polk Park across from the entrance to Navy Pier. (Jodie Jacobs photo)
The photography exhibit is in Polk Park across from the entrance to Navy Pier. (Jodie Jacobs photo)

Two art shows

“Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace: The Doughboys1917-1918” is at Navy Pier beginning Oct. 5 and continuing through Nov. 18, 2018 in Polk Bros Park (across from the Pier’s entrance). A free exhibit, the works are by photo journalist Michael St. Maur Sheil.

Taken over eight years, the compilation tells stories of battleground transformations, peace and remembrance. It works well with Navy Pier’s history. Originally called the “Municipal Pier” it was later renamed Navy Pier in honor of naval veterans who served in World War I. (It became a training center for the U.S.Navy in 1941before returning to public use for an education institution and then an entertainment destination).

An opening commemorative event is at the Pier Oct. 5 at 5:15 p.m. followed by the Navy Band Great Lakes Wind Ensemble that plays at 6 p.m. in the Crystal Gardens. For more information call (800) 595-PIER (7437 and visit Navy Pier. Navy Pier is at 600 E. Grand Ave., Chicago.

 

The Chicago Creative Coalition (C3) is holding its 20th Annual Gallery Walk Oct. 18 2018 at four River North galleries. Basically a semi- private tour, the Gallery Walk requires registration. C3 members $15, general admission $20, students $5. Visit Gallery Walk Registration.

Music on Halsted All-Inn event
Music on Halsted All-Inn event

Two Festivals

All-Inn fest, a three-day indoor music festival will be at Halsted Street bars from aliveOne to The Store from Oct. 11 through Oct. 13, 2018. Admission is free with a wristband gotten from aliveOne, Tonic Room or The Store. Bar and band hop beginning at 8 p.m. For more information visit Lincoln Park Chamber All Inn.

Randolph Street Market goes indoors with Octoberfest Oct. 27-28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. An indoor venue featuring more than 125 vendors, the Market is at 1341 Randolph St. The Octoberfest celebration will have pumpkins but also antiques and clothing. For more information visit Randolph Street Octoberfest.

 

A pumpkin guards the path at the Chicago Botanic Garden (J Jacobs photo)
A pumpkin guards the path at the Chicago Botanic Garden (J Jacobs photo)

Two spooky-ish fall color destinations

Visitors to the Morton Arboretum can combine leaf looks with the scarecrows, cider and scary adventures of the season at the Morton Arboretum during the Fall corol festival. Also, look for the Glass Pumpkin Patch and Jack o Lantern Hikes dates.The Morton Arboretum is at 4100 Hwy 53. Lisle, IL  For more information go to Morton Arb.

Pumpkins at the Chicago Botanic Garden will be lining the walkways Oct. 24-28, 2018 from 6:30-10:30 p.m. during the annual Night of 1000 Jack o Lanterns. Take photos for some ideas of how to carve your pumpkin next year. The Chicago Botanic Garden is at 1000 Lake Cook Rd. Glencoe. The event has timed tickets. For tickets and other info visit Chicago Botanic.

Enjoy October!

Jodie Jacobs

 

 

 

 

 

Stories of Chicago in Music

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Baiocchi performance (Reno Lovison photo)
Baiocchi performance (Reno Lovison photo)

Created as part of the Bach+Beethoven Experience, “Chicago Stories: Book 2” challenges local composers to write a musical suite that utilizes baroque instruments to tell a story about Chicago.

One of the hallmarks of Bach+Beethoven Experience is to create a casual relaxed atmosphere to enjoy music of vintage instruments. There is nothing stuffy about this experience and I venture to say it can be enjoyed by virtually anyone regardless of musical tastes or preferred musical genre.

The premiere performance was presented Sept. 29, 2018 in the Sky Room at the Loyola Park Field House in Rogers Park overlooking Lake Michigan.

The first suite, “Stories of the Bloomingdale Trail” by Ronnie Kuller, was created to evoke memories of the trail’s past as part of an industrial corridor and rail line that contrasted with the present sounds of the walkers, runners, and bicyclists who enjoy the narrow elevated green space. The trail cuts a nearly three-mile path parallel to North Avenue from Ashland on the east to roughly Central Park on the west.Read More

Change Can Be Difficult

 

Front, Rashada Dawan, Back left to right Emma Sipora Tyler and Tyler Symone. (Photo by Marisa KM)
Front, Rashada Dawan, Back left to right Emma Sipora Tyler and Tyler Symone. (Photo by Marisa KM)

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Set during a changing period in recent history near New Orleans in 1963 “Caroline, or Change” is an emotionally charged story about the power of money and fear of change.

Caroline (Rashada Dawan) is a maid in a modest Jewish household in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Her employer Stuart Gellman (Jonathan Schwart) is a widower who has recently married one of his deceased wife’s friends, Rose (Blair Robertson) who hails from the Upper West Side of New York.

For Rose change is manifest in the challenges presented by her new life in the South which include a despondent husband, his eight year-old grieving son Noah (Alejandro Medina) and “negro” housekeeper whose life is slowly unraveling as she quietly struggles to keep it together.

It is the dawn of the civil rights movement, times are changing, President JFK has just been assassinated. Caroline is recently divorced, has three girls (Bre Jacobs, Princess Isis Z. Lang and Lyric K. Sims) at home and a grown son in Vietnam. To make matters worse she is under employed and feeling like she has no skills that would allow her to change her circumstances.

Caroline’s oldest daughter Emmie Thibodeaux (Bre Jacobs ) represents the new generation and the change that is coming.

The term “change” takes on a double meaning as the plot pivots around Noah’s habit of leaving loose change in his pants pockets where Caroline routinely finds it while doing the laundry and where the odd coins become a catalyst for a change in attitudes.

One can nit-pick but every member of this perfect cast turned in wonderful performances in a nearly flawless production directed by Lili-Anne Brown with a nearly flawless script featuring book and lyrics by Tony Kushner, and music by Jeanine Tesori.

The actors are accompanied by the musical direction and keyboard of Andra Velis Simon with her excellent four piece band, Yulia Block (percussion), Kimberly Lawson (violin) Emily Beisel (reeds) and Myles Bacon (guitars).

There is virtually no break in the music from beginning to end so it is difficult to single out individual performances. But, the charming jump rope style song “Roosevelt Petrucius Coleslaw” sung by  Caroline’s adorable daughters and joined by Noah in Act One, as well as her own show stopping “Lot’s Wife” toward the end of Act Two were memorable moments for me.

If you are unfamiliar with this play I suggest you definitely put it on your “must see” list. And I will venture to say, that you are not going to get a much better chance than this Firebrand Theatre presentation of “Caroline, or Change.”

DETAILS: “Caroline, or Change,” a Firebrand Theatre production, is at The Den Theatre’s Heath Main Stage, 1331 N. Milwaukee Ave. through Oct. 28, 2018. Running time: 2 hrs., 30 min. For tickets or other information visit Firebrand Theatre.

Reno Lovison

For more shows visit Theatre in Chicago

 

‘Tootsie’ is ready for Broadway

Santino Fontana in 'Tootsie' at the Cadillac Palace Theatre. (Julieta Cervantes photo)
Santino Fontana in ‘Tootsie’ at the Cadillac Palace Theatre. (Julieta Cervantes photo)

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

When “Tootsie,” a Columbia Motion Pictures film  based on a book by Don McGuire and Larry Gelbart, came out in 1982, it received 10 Academy Award nominations. Adapted by Gelbart with uncredited assistance from Elaine May, Barry Levinson and Murray Schisgal, its cast had Dustin Hoffman starring and included, Jessica Lange, Teri Garr and Bill Murray.

Tthe movie, a tale of how an actor who has trouble finding a job adopts a female persona in order to land a role, presents a myriad of riotous scenarios.

Although really funny, the telling point of the film was that the Library of Congress decided to preserve it in the National Film Registry in 1998 because it was culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Given the current culturally and historically significant climate of women’s issues, “Tootsie” as a musical comedy with a clever book by Robert Horn (“13”) and witty and insightful score by Tony winner David Yazbek (“The Band’s Visit), promises to be a Tony winner when it goes to Broadway Spring of 2019.

Nods to the “Me Too” and other concerns are scattered throughout the musical from a show director guiding a female cast member off stage while saying “I’m not touching you” to a character noting that female actors are paid less than the males.

Instead of following the film and having the lead don female garb to tryout and land a soap opera role, the musical has Michael Dorsey snagging the role of Dorothy Michaels, Juliet’s nurse, in a crazy adaptation of “Romeo and Juliet.”  In cahoots with Juliet, he takes over the show to make a feminist statement and promote the character of Dorothy.

It is hard to picture the role played any better than it is currently handled by Tony Award nominee Santino Fontana (“Cinderella”) who nails the character’s angst and Dorothy’s feminine side while holding onto his own masculinity, his natural attraction to Juliet (Julie Nichols) plus his feelings for his girlfriend, Sandy Lester (Sarah Stiles).

Lilli Cooper is well cast as Julie, innocent of her attraction to Dorsey as Dorothy. Stiles is amazing as Sandy who sings a rapid-fire accounting of all her problems in a style reminiscent of Gilbert and Sullivan.

The rest of the cast is also sterling with Broadway actors John Behlmann playing Max Van Horn, Andy Groteluesche as Jeff Slater, Julie Halston as Rita Marshall and Michael McGrath as Stan Fields and theater, film and TV actor as Ron Carlisle.

Superb choreography by Denis Jones, gorgeous costumes by William Ivey Long and spot-on set design by David Rockwell are all worthy of Broadway nominations.

Just as important, under the fine direction of Scott Elis the show moves at an energetic pace that enhance comedic and startling moments.

Lucky for Chicago audiences it is following in the steps of such other Broadway hits as “Kinky Boots,” previewing in our city before heading to New York. It is currently showing at the Cadillac Palace Theatre.

DETAILS: “Tootsie” is at the Cadilac Palace theatre, 151 W. Randolph St., Chicago, through Oct. 14, 2018. Running time: 2 hrs, 20 min. with one intermission. For tickets and other information call (800) 775-2000 and visit Broadway In Chicago.

Jodie Jacobs

For more shows visit Theatre in Chicago

 

 

Museum quality art on view at Expo Chicago

 

Ajarb Bernard Ategwa, "Sweet Dreams" Acrylic on canvas, ( photo by Perez Projects, Berlin)
Ajarb Bernard Ategwa, “Sweet Dreams” Acrylic on canvas, ( photo by Perez Projects, Berlin)

Unless you purposely seek out art galleries in Chicago, across the US and when traveling abroad, you are likely to miss seeing what is happening in the world of modern and contemporary art. But Expo Chicago offers a chance to catch up on the global art scene in one weekend, in one place. Happening now at Navy Pier it only goes through Sept. 30, 2018,

Basically, it is impossible to walk among the more than 130 galleries exhibiting upstairs in Navy Pier’s Festival Hall without stopping for a closer look at eye-catching sculptures and paintings or fascinating photography displays.

A brilliant wall-sized piece by Cameroonian,artist Ajarb Bernard Ategwa stops browsers at the Peres Projects Gallery.  It turns out that the gallery is located in Berlin.

When asked why come from Germany to Chicago for Expo, owner Javier Peres,said,”  We love the energy of Chicago, it’s collectors and institutions. It’s a truly American city, diverse and dynamic and we are keen to engage with the city and also the entire Midwest region more.”

 

Sanford Bigger's sculpture at moniquemeloche at Expo Chicago (J Jacobs photo)
Sanford Bigger’s sculpture at moniquemeloche at Expo Chicago (J Jacobs photo)

An American Flag sculpture by internationally known, Harlam-based, artist Sanford Biggers, draws visitors to moniquemeloche a popular Chicago gallery with a new West Town location.

Nearby the dark works of Dawoud Bey pull people into the shared space of the Rena Bransten Gallery of San Francisco with the  Stephen Daiter Gallery    “They represent what a runaway slave might be seeing,” said Daiter.

Dawoud Bey, 2017 "Night Coming Tenderly b;acl (Picket Fence and Farmhouse). (J Jacobs photo)
Dawoud Bey, 2017 “Night Coming Tenderly b;acl (Picket Fence and Farmhouse). (J Jacobs photo)

In the same gallery are photos by Kenneth Josephson who likes to put scenes into perspective with a ruler or some other held object. Josephson’s work is featured in a show up now at the MCA that includes some photos on loan from the Daiter Gallery.

For Expo Chicago hours, tickets and other information visit Expo Chicago.

For more on art in Chicago this weekend visit Chicago becomes art central.

Jodie Jacobs

 

‘White Rabbit Red Rabbit’ is a Fuzzy Tale

SOMEWHAT RECOMMENDED

A different performer takes on White Rabbit Red Rabbit at each Interrobang production.
A different performer takes on White Rabbit Red Rabbit at each Interrobang production.

It can be said that any piece of literature is a conversation with the author across time and space but Iranian playwright Nassim Soleimanpour takes this to a new level.

For those interested in a nontraditional performance experience, “White Rabbit Red Rabbit” presented by Interrobang Theatre Project is an enjoyable, thought provoking, perhaps at times, philosophical, leap into experimental theater.

A different actor every night is presented with a few props and a sealed script which is opened on stage. At this point the actor follows the instructions and performs accordingly. Performers: Stephanie Shum (September 24) JD Caudill (October 1), Echaka Agba (October 8), Michael Turrentine (October 15), Joe Lino (October 22), David Cerda (October 29), Shawna Franks (November 5) and Owais Ahmed (November 12).

For some this may be a trip down a proverbial rabbit hole but others like “Alice” may encounter a splendid adventure.

Part of the intrigue is that no one (including me) is permitted to talk about the details of the play because no one sees exactly the same show twice.

Approximately one hour long, it is a kind of improvisational comedic/dramatic,social experiment.

If you are expecting a traditional night at the theater this may not be your thing but if you are looking for a refreshing break from the ordinary then hop over to see “White Rabbit Red Rabbit.”

DETAILS: “White Rabbit Red Rabbit” is at The Den Theatre, 1331 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago, through Nov. 12, 2018. For tickets and other information call (312) 219-4140 and visit Interrobangtheatre.

Reno Lovison

For more shows visit Theatre in Chicago

Powerful solo show commands Goodman stage

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

David Cale in his show at Goodman Theatre. (Photo by Liz Loren)
David Cale in his show at Goodman Theatre. (Photo by Liz Loren)

We’re told not to give away plot points  of “We’re Only Alive for A Short Amount of Time,” British born, American actor, singer, composer David Cale’s musical memoir now in its world premiere at Goodman Theatre.

So suffice it to say Cale takes audiences from his unusual growing up years through how an early tragedy impacted him and his family to his leaving England for a new life in the United States where he blossoms as an adult and loves being alive.

OK, that’s an oversimplification.

“We’re Only Alive for A Short Amount of Time” is a commanding performance that combines acting and singing.

Cale adopts the mantle of each of his characters. His change of voice, movements, prose and lyrical poetry set to music, pull audiences into how he thinks family members and he viewed life and each other.

The changes are complemented by a superb six-piece orchestra on stage directed by co-composer/arranger pianist Matthew Dean Marsh. They are adroitly lit in parts and whole by Jennifer Tipton. Kevin Depinet’s creative set design enhances the verbal pictures painted by Cale.

No matter what else the show is and does for audiences, it is his tribute to his mother. If viewers look at the playbill cover they will see a woman pictured on his shirt. It is no accident that her picture is placed over his heart.

What is hard to believe is that he tells his story in 90 minutes, a short amount of time given that it has enough plot points to fill a two hour play or three-hour opera.

But Cale who has written one-person shows before, likely understands that brief exposure makes powerful statements.

Directed with great insight and empathy by Robert Falls, “We’re Only alive for A Short Amount of Time” is definitely powerful.

DETAILS: “We’re Only Alive for A Short Amount of Time” is at Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn St., Chicago through Oct. 21, 2018. Running time: 90 min. no intermission. For tickets and other information call (312) 443-3800 and visit Goodmantheatre.

Jodie Jacobs

For more shows visit Theatre in Chicago

 

 

 

Chicago becomes art central last September weekend

 

Visitors at the opening night Vernissage event see Expo Chicago exhibits. (Expo Chicago photo)
Visitors at the opening night Vernissage event see Expo Chicago exhibits. (Expo Chicago photo)

When Art Expo rolls around each year, lots of galleries and art institutions not only participate in the Expo’s Navy Pier events and exhibits, they also hold their own new exhibitions

With so many places taking part as partners ranging from the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Art Institute of Chicago, The Block Museum of Art and the Elmhurst  Art Museum to the American Writers Museum, Chicago Artists Coalition, Chicago Cultural Center, the Richard H. Driehouse Museum, the Dusable Museum of  African American History and Peninsuala Chicago,(to name just a few) about the only way to fit in all the terrific art and events is to plan ahead. So take a look at what is being offered when.

Art Expo

Held Sept. 27-30, 2018 at Navy Pier’s Festival Hall, Art Expo visitors get to can see works that are making statements in 135 galleries from 63 cities around the globe. For hours and tickets visit tickets.

For a special viewing opening night, Sept. 27, that includes cocktails and benefits a fine Chicago institution see Vernissage.

While at Expo,  look for the large sculptures and hanging works of the In Situ artists including Judy Chicago’s “Cartoon for The Fall from the Holocaust Projgect 1987″ from the Jessica Silverman Gallery of San Francisco and NY.

Try also to take in one of Expo’s informative treats, Dialogues – Symposium on Sept. 28. It is a day-long progam that has a variety of  informative discussions with artists, curators, and other art professionals. Dialogues partners  include theArt Institute of Chicago, Art Design Chicago and Terra Foundation for American Art..

To learn about other fine exhibits and programs by partnering organization and museums visit art week.

One place you don’t go inside but will see if you are near the Merchandise Mart after dark is “Art on the Mart” Sept. 29. Look for an artistic light show on the front of the Mart starting at 6:30 p.m. Wacker Drive will be closed to traffic between Wells and Franklin Streets because of the projections,  a Lantern Procession by Light Up My Arts, food trucks and a DJ.

Jim Nutt "Miss K Knows" at the Art Institute of Chicago in the" Hairy Who" exhibit opening Sept. 26, 2018. (AIC photo)
Jim Nutt “Miss K Knows” at the Art Institute of Chicago in the” Hairy Who” exhibit opening Sept. 26, 2018. (AIC photo)

Art Institute of Chicago

Art Expo weekend is the last chance to see “John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age” which closes Sept. 30. It surprises viewers with the depth of art styles used by Sargent who is best known for his portraits.

But this week is also the opening of “Hairy Who,” another surprising exhibit. The name is attached to a group of six influential Chicago artists known for their unconventional, graphic works.

Museum of Contemporary Art

“Enrico David: Gradations of Slow Release” opens at the MCA Chicago Sept. 29 of Expo weekend. Within an easy bus ride from Navy Pier, the show introduces viewers to this Italian-born artist who currently resides in London and has works in such renown institutions as the Tate Modern and Hirshhorn Museum.

The MCA show is the first United States exhibition of Enrico David’s work.

 

Jodie Jacobs

 

 

 

‘Curve of Departure’ raises interesting family issues

RECOMMENDED

From left, Rudy (Mike Nussbaum),Linda (Penelope Walker), Jackson (Danny Martinez) and Felix (Sean Parris in 'Curve of Departure' at Northlight Theatre. (Photo by Michael Brosilow)
From left, Rudy (Mike Nussbaum),Linda (Penelope Walker), Jackson (Danny Martinez) and Felix (Sean Parris in ‘Curve of Departure’ at Northlight Theatre. (Photo by Michael Brosilow)

In Rachel Bonds’ “Curve of Departure,” now at Northlight Theatre, you see four characters who face different issues they sort of resolve by the end of the 75-minute play.

The characters, Rudy (Mike Nussbaum), ex-daughter-in-law Linda (Penelope Walker), her son, Felix called Fe, (Sean Parris) and Fe’s boyfriend, Jackson ,(Danny Martinez) have come together for the funeral of Rudy’s son, and Linda’s former husband, Cyrus, who is only a presence by their discussion of how awful he was.

Rudy’s grandson and his friend share a New Mexico motel room with Rudy and Linda to save money.

It is easy to get caught up in their troubles without realizing the big picture.

Read More